Tories Make Arrest

Tories Make Arrest

They were brought together and marched off in the direction of Ninety Six. At a place of rendezvous on Little River they were all tried for their lives. Capts. Patton and Elder, with Charles Bruce and another man named Elder, were condemned to be hung. Col. Roebuck and the rest were sent to jail in Ninety Six and continued there until within a few days of the time when Gen. Greene laid siege to that place. Some of the prisoners were then paroled and allowed to return to their homes, while others, and among them Col. Roebuck, were sent off to the prison ships.

Mr. Smith thinks Col. Roebuck was not exchanged until the fall. He was taken on the night on March 10. His death occurred in the year 1787. Mr. Smith further states that Col. Roebuck was in the Battles of Ramseur’s Mill and King’s Mountain. And the writer supposes he was also in the others in that campaign in which some of his regiments were present, viz.: Hanging Rock, Rocky Mount and Musgrove’s Mill. He was not at Blackstock’s, but near, and in the course of the succeeding night was very busy in giving notice to the Whigs round about of the impending danger, by which a number escaped capture. But unfortunately his aged father fell into the hands of the British and died of disease in confinement.

Capt. Robert Thomas, mentioned above, was the son of Col. John Thomas sr. Mrs. McHargue of Green County, Ga., is his daughter. His brother, William Thomas, was wounded in the same engagement. The descendants of Col. Henry White may be found in great numbers at present in Spartanburg District.