No Such Thing as Good Tory

No Such Thing as Good Tory

Thus we perceive six classes among the Loyalists — a conscientious class, an ignorant class, an indifferent class, a covetous, bargain-making class; a roguish class, and we might add a disappointed, revengeful class. The reader is not to suppose that these characteristics were never combined. Several of them have a natural affinity for each other and are almost in variably found united in the same person. Men conscientiously opposed to war rarely take pleasure in those exercises useful as a preparation for it; they choose to keep out of its noise and din. Cowards also prefer a peaceful fireside to the sharp shooting and broadsword of the battlefield. Men indifferent in feelings to the issues of a contest generally avoid the exposure of toilsome conflicts. But Ferguson’s camp was soon crowded with men making high professions of loyalty and willing to serve the King in any capacity required. And he set himself to work in training his raw recruits for the further subjugation of the country. And from what we have seen, it is not wonderful that the Tories were as heartily despised by the British officers as by their own countrymen, the Whigs. But Ferguson was not a man to be diverted from his purpose by acts of inhumanity and treachery. The crown had honors and rewards to bestow and his eye rested upon them. He knew that the “defender of the faith” generally gave more cash for one year of kind service in military enterprise than for a lifetime spent in such pursuits as exalt and ennoble human nature.