Sketch of Col. Benjamin Roebuck

Sketch of Col. Benjamin Roebuck

The father of Col. Roebuck removed from the North (probably Virginia) in 1777 and settled upon Tyger River a short distance above Blackstock’s Ford. Upon the first call for soldiers after his arrival his son, Benjamin, turned out and was made First Lieutenant in the company of Capt. William Smith; was with Gen. Lincoln in Georgia and participated in the various campaigns until the fall of Charleston. Shortly after that event he fled with others into North Carolina. During his absence he was appointed a Major in the 1st Spartan Regiment, of which Col. John Thomas Jr. was about that time appointed Colonel. He was Lieut. Colonel at the Battle of the Cowpens. Soon after that event Thomas received a Colonel’s commission in a different department of the service and Roebuck succeeded in command of the 1st Spartan Regiment and White rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

Mr. Smith further states that as soon as Col. Roebuck returned to the neighborhood after the Battle of the Cowpens he engaged actively in warfare with the Tories who came up from the direction of Ninety Six to harass the Whigs in the region round about. (Mr. Smith had come back in a few days after that battle; Roebuck probably accompanied Morgan beyond the Yadkin.) After various conflicts, marches and counter marches, Roebuck was surprised one night in the neighborhood of his home in company with Capt. Matthew Patton, and both were taken. On the same night Mr. Smith was also taken prisoner, and perhaps a dozen more in the same section.