Retreat From Musgrove’s

Retreat From Musgrove’s

They, therefore, turned their faces toward the mountains of North Carolina in order to make good their retreat and secure the results of their victory. Their march was continued the balance of the day, through the night and the next day without stopping to take any other refreshment than drinking from the brooks by the way, pulling green corn from the fields near their road and eating it raw. Ferguson pursued, but found the backwoods men too fleet to be overtaken. The writer remembers having heard the late Major John Alexander, who died in Lawrenceville, Ga., May, 1820, speak of this march. He stated that he was without food for nearly four days. When his engagements permitted and the opportunity offered he pulled some corn and ate it raw and found it delicious. Major Alexander’s residence at the time was at the fork of Tyger River, in the Nazareth congregation, and the retreating army passed through this congregation and up the North Tyger. The panic which followed Gates’s defeat induced McDowell’s army to disperse, and the leaders of the heroes of Musgrove’s Mill, having kept together for several days after the battle separated, each to obey his own impulses in rousing the spirits of his countrymen to resistance and in affording protection to their friends from the insults of a triumphant invader.