A Rendezvous for Whigs

A Rendezvous for Whigs

Love’s Ford of Broad River is some miles below the mouth of Pacolet. Crossing at this place was somewhat difficult and not without danger to persons not acquainted with the place. In addition to the difficulties in the stream itself, the country around was in a wild, unsettled state at the period of the Revolutionary War. The low ground was covered with dense canebrakes, the hills, abundant round about, clad with reeds and wild peavines to their very summits. This vicinity afforded an excellent shelter for fugitives during the period of the Tory ascendency in South Carolina. At this time the ford was rarely passed except by armed bands and the more adventurous persons of the vicinity. The Whigs resident in adjacent parts of the country were accustomed to frequent the locality for the double purpose of concealment and to embarrass the movements of the enemy through this section.

On the evening of the next day after the Battle at Cowpens a party of some fifty or sixty British troops, having succeeded in making good their retreat that far from the battle, were moving on toward Love’s Ford. Their object was to reach the camp of Lord Cornwallis. Some distance from the river their leader turned off the road to the house of a Mr. Palmer to get directions. Here he met Mr. Sharp. The latter immediately presented his rifle and ordered him to surrender. The officer obeyed. Sharp learned his character, object, &c., as quick as possible.