Prepare for Indians

Prepare for Indians

From various indications among the Indians in the first part of the spring of 1775 the Whigs along the frontiers felt apprehensions of danger, but had no means of knowing the nature of the conspiracy and the extent of the dark cloud which threw its shadows above the horizon. They, however, consulted for their safety. In the month of May a number of soldiers embodied under Gen. Williamson and a camp formed upon Fair forest Creek in the vicinity of Col. Thomas’s. Messengers were sent out to ascertain the intention of the Indians. These messengers were killed. As soon as Williamson was informed of the attack upon the people he marched to their rescue. The Indians were overtaken at the residence of Richard Parris, the present site of Greenville Court House. The Indians fled with their allies, the Tories. A number of prisoners were retaken, and among them the daughters of Capt. Ford. Williamson stopped a few days to recruit. Thence he pursued to the nearest towns on Seneca and Tugalo. Different battles and skirmishes occurred in the environs of these towns. Williamson then halted for a while in Seneca Town, on the river of the same name. From this place a number of his men were permitted to go home to obtain clothing and other supplies. Among these were Joseph McJunkin, who served in this expedition in the company of

Capt. Joseph Jolly in the regiment of Col. Thomas. “As soon as we returned,” says Major McJunkin, “Williamson took up the line of march with a view of penetrating the Indian country to the middle settlements on the Hiwassee River. The Indians were assailed at the same time by Gen. Rutherford of North Carolina , Col. Christian of Virginia, and Col. Jack of Georgia. After passing through several deserted Indian towns Williamson’s command passed a part of the North Carolina army, from whom he learned that their main body had gone to attack the valley towns. Soon after passing them, on Sept. 22, the advance of Williamson’s army fell into an ambuscade prepared for the North Carolina army. The Indians were posted on the crest and sides of a mountain in the form of a horseshoe. Williamson’s advance defiled through the gorge, which might be called the heel, and were suffered to approach the part which may be called the toe. In an instant in front, in rear, on the right and the left, the warwhoop sounded.