Mrs. Thomas at Ninety Six

Mrs. Thomas at Ninety Six

Some time after the fall of Charleston Mrs. Thomas was at Ninety Six on a visit to her husband and two of her sons who were prisoners with the British at that post. While there she heard two women in conversation, and one remarked to the other: “On tomorrow night the Loyalists intend to surprise the rebels at Cedar Spring.” This intelligence was interesting news to her, for the Cedar Spring was within a few miles of her house, and among the Whigs posted there were several of her own children. She therefore determined to apprise them of the attack, though the distance was at least fifty miles. The Whigs were informed of their danger in time to provide for their safety, which they did by withdrawing from their fires until the enemy rushed within their light in confidence of an easy victory. Instead, however, of butchering a slumbering foe, they received the well-directed blows of their intended victims, and on that night victory perched upon the standard of liberty. The Whigs were in number about sixty, the Loyalists 150.

On Nov. 1, 1779, Capt. McJunkin was ordered by Col. Brandon to Charleston to do a tour of duty for four months. During this time he fell under the command of Lieut. Col. James Steen, who was stationed at the Ten Mile Spring. At the end of February, 1780, he returned home with his company.

When the news of the fall of Charleston reached the up-country the Whig population was greatly alarmed. And their consternation was by no means abated by the accounts of ravages committed by the victorious troops of Britain and the insolence of the Loyalists who thought proper no longer to disguise their devotion to the royal cause. As a large number of these had hitherto maintained a strict neutrality under the pretense of being non-combatants and as they now entertained but little doubt of success on the part of the British, they must need display a great zeal for the party in power to cast the veil of oblivion over their past lukewarmness, and meet the agents of despotism as though they were and ever had been the very champions of England.