Give Battle to the Indians

Give Battle to the Indians

The warwhoop was answered by a shout of defiance, and the rifles of the Indians answered by an aim equally deadly. The whites were pressed into a circle by their foes and hence the battle was called the Ring Fight. As soon as the firing was heard the main army pressed to the rescue. Before their arrival the advance had to contend with fearful odds. It was not only a woodsman’s fight from tree to tree, but often from hand to hand. Among these, Major Ross of York District had a hard scuffle with an Indian, in which the nerve of the white man prevailed over the dexterity of the red. On the arrival of the main army the Indians were charged on all sides and driven from their chosen position. A large quantity of parched corn, dressed deerskins and moccasins were left on the ground. Among the slain a number of Creek Indians were discovered. In this action Cols. Thomas Neal of York District, John Thomas of Spartanburg, John Lysle of Newberry and Thomas Sumpter participated. The latter, who commanded the regulars, particularly distinguished himself. Major Andrew Pickens also gave manifestations of those qualities which subsequently elevated him in the estimation of his fellow soldiers.

The next day the army proceeded to the valley towns along the Hiwassee. A great quantity of corn and other provisions were here destroyed. Some however, was thrown into the river, floated down and lodged in fish traps and was afterward found and preserved by the Indians. The army spent a few days at these towns, then crossed the Hiwassee and turned up a river then called Lawassee. On this latter stream were some beautiful towns. This river flowed nearly from south to north. After descending this river some distance Williamson’s army met that from North Carolina. The two encamped near each other one night. Thence Williamson crossed over the southern waters; that is, the head streams of the Cattahoochee River. Here he passed a beautiful fenced town called Chota. Here intelligence was received that the Indians were encamped in force at a town twenty miles distant at a place called Frog Town. Col. Sumpter was ordered to lead a party, of which McJunkin was one, and surprise them.