Fletcher for the King

Fletcher for the King

To counteract the influence of those gentlemen and, if possible, to obliterate the impressions made by them, Col. Fletcher engaged the services of a man by the name of Robinson. This Robinson was a young man of classical education and respectable talents. He had been educated in Virginia for the ministry in the Presbyterian Church , but rendered himself peculiarly odious to that denomination by an attempt to obtain orders in the established church in the Province by fraud for one Cotton, an illiterate and abandoned wretch. The nature of the transaction was reported to the proper authority and Cotton and Robinson fled from the country.

Robinson was sent by Fletcher to Charlotte to confer with Lord William Campbell, the Royal Governor, as to the best means of keeping the people in a quiet and loyal state. Campbell sent a parcel of pamphlets, called cutters, to Fletcher for distribution among the people. The scope of these pamphlets was to show the sin of resisting the laws and policy of the Lord’s anointed, the evils which would result, and to offer encouragement to support the measures of the British crown. On his return Fletcher called public meetings in different parts and put up Robinson to address the people in support of those measures which he wished to see triumphant.