Cornwallis Sees Ghosts

Cornwallis Sees Ghosts

But a more immediate cause of dread was about his own quarters. He had no cavalry of any worth. A strange looking set of horsemen prowled about his camp and seemed extremely busy looking into all of his arrangements. In vain he ordered them to be fired on; in vain he sent parties in pursuit. They went and came when they pleased, insulted sentinels and behaved as though they had as lieve charge right through his army as any other way. It added not a little to his perplexity that their dress was different from that of any rebels he had ever seen before, and his prisoners knew as little whence they had come as he did. He finally set a favorite dog after them one day and the fellow had the audacity to shoot the dog in sight of His Lordship. From dread or some other cause he was a day’s march from the place where Tarleton had a right to expect he would be when he attacked Morgan.