Cols. Roebuck and White

Cols. Roebuck and White

“The names of Col. Benjamin Roebuck and Lieut. Col. Henry White are not mentioned in our Revolutionary history, and yet there were not two more active or useful partisan officers at the time in the service of their country. Col. Roebuck was the beau ideal of a gallant officer, brave to a fault and as disinterested as he was brave. There never lived a man more devoted, heart, soul and body, to the service of his country than this gentleman. His memory is now cherished by the few surviving soldiers of his regiment with a fondness and enthusiasm bordering on idolatry. He was, as is believed, a native of Spartanburg District, and commanded a regiment of her militia throughout the American Revolution. He had the command of a Colonel in the Battle of Cowpens, and was the first who received the attack of the British in that memorable engagement. He was in many other battles and in all of them displayed the undaunted courage of a hero and the skill of an experienced officer. He was taken prisoner and confined in close custody at Ninety Six. He was several times wounded, and suffered much from his wounds. He died at the close of the war. He was never married.

“Col. White was the intimate friend and companion-in-arms of Col. Roebuck. He, too, was a most active, gallant and useful officer throughout the whole of our struggle for independence. He served at the Siege of Ninety Six, was in the battles of Cowpens and Eutaw under Gen. Greene. After the last named battle he returned home and was actively employed in Spartanburg District in purging the community of those predatory bands of Tories which were the terror and pest of the country. He lived to a good old age and saw his country enjoy peace and prosperity, those blessings for which he had so manfully fought and bled in his younger days.”

This long extract has been transcribed by the writer for the following reasons: 1. It falls naturally into his narrative of events. 2. It is due to the actors that their hard-earned fame should be preserved. 3. With a view to offering criticisms in reference to some of the facts stated. The writer, however, is far from wishing to excite unpleasant feelings in the mind of the gentleman who penned this extract. On the contrary he takes this opportunity of tendering him thanks for his industry and zeal in collecting his “Revolutionary Incidents,” published in the Magnolia for 1842.