Col. Moore Surrenders Stronghold

Col. Moore Surrenders Stronghold

With characteristic intrepidity these commanders appeared suddenly before this fortress, threw their lines around it and demanded its surrender. The second summons was obeyed. Moore surrendered 100 men, with 250 stands of arms loaded with ball and buckshot and so arranged at the portholes as to have repulsed double the number of the American detachment.

The effective force of Col. Ferguson at this time amounted to more than 2,500 men, composed of British and Tories. McDowell’s force was too small to meet his antagonist in the field with any prospect of success. He therefore deemed it expedient to maintain his position at the Cherokee Ford, guard against surprise and harass his adversary in hope of soon acquiring a force sufficient to expel him from the country. He had under his command officers and men possessing peculiar qualifications for accomplishing such a task, and by no means averse to daring enterprise.

Accordingly, soon after the return of the party from the capture of Moore, Shelby and Clarke were again in the field at the head of 600 mounted rifle men, with a view of passing beyond Pacolet River for the purpose of cutting off the foraging parties of the enemy. They crossed that stream near where the Rolling Mill Place now is and sent out patrol parties to give intelligence of the enemy and watch his movements. Ferguson soon penetrated the designs of his adversaries and set his army in motion to drive them from the country. Major Dunlop advanced to Cedar Spring and Ferguson with his whole force was but a few miles in his rear. Shelby’s force occupied a position near the present site of Bivingsville. Various attempts were made to fall upon the Americans by surprise, but these schemes were baffled.