Clowney Makes Big Haul

Clowney Makes Big Haul

Some time during the heat of the conflict in upper South Carolina, Samuel Clowney, an Irishman and a most determined Whig, was on a scout accompanied by a Negro man of remarkable fidelity to his master and withal a strong Whig. As Clowney was approaching the margin of a stream he heard a party of horsemen approaching from the opposite direction. It was dark. He conjectured that they must be Tories and determined to try his hand with the whole party. He gave the Negro an intimation of his intention and of the part he should act. They remained quietly at the brink of the creek until the party was within the banks. He then demanded who they were. They answered, “Friends to the King!” He ordered them to come out instantly and give up their arms or they would be cut to pieces. They obeyed. He directed his men, as though he had a dozen or two, to gather up the arms and surround the prisoners. He then ordered them forward march, under the direction of the guide, and conducted them in safety to his own party. The prisoners were much chagrined when they found their captors to be only two in number, while they were five.