Battle of Mudlick Creek

Battle of Mudlick Creek

“The Battle of Mudlick was fought in the summer of 1781 by the remnant of a regiment of militia under the command of Col. Benjamin Roebuck and a garrison of British soldiers and Tories stationed at Williams’s Fort in Newberry District. The Whigs did not exceed 150 men, while the enemy was greatly superior in point of numbers and had the protection of a strong fortress. In order to deprive them of this advantage the following stratagem was resorted to by Col. Roebuck and Lieut, Col. White.

“Those of the Whigs who were mounted riflemen were ordered to show themselves in front of the fortress and then retreat to an advantageous position selected by the commanding officer. The enemy no sooner saw the militia retreating than they commenced a hot pursuit, confident of an easy victory. Their first onset was a furious one, but was in some measure checked by Col. White and his riflemen. As soon as the ‘green coat cavalry’ made their appearance Col. White leveled his rifle at one of the officers in front and felled him to the ground.

“This successful shot was immediately followed by others from the mounted riflemen, which brought the cavalry to a halt until the infantry came up. The engagement then became general and waged with great heat for some time. The fate of the battle seemed uncertain for fifty or sixty minutes. At length the British and Tories were entirely routed, after having sustained considerable loss in proportion to their numbers. The loss of the Whigs was nothing like so great, but they had to lament the loss of several officers and brave soldiers. Among the former was Capt. Robert Thomas. Col. White was badly wounded, but recovered. This engagement was known as the Battle of Mudlick from the creek on which Williams’s Fort stood. It is not mentioned in any history of the American Revolution, though its consequences were of the highest importance to the Whigs of Newberry and adjoining districts. It broke up the enemy’s stronghold in that section of country and relieved the people from those marauding bands which infested every part of the state where there was a British station.