The Affair at Blackstock’s

The Affair at Blackstock’s

Major McJunkin, who was Officer of the Day, immediately sent a messenger to Sumpter to let him know that the enemy were in sight. Orders were returned to come up to the house. Tarleton having viewed Sumpter’s position, concluded to guard his opponent and hold him there until the balance of his force should come up. Sumpter was not of the metal to submit to such bondage. He drew up his force and called for volunteers to sally out and commence an action.

Col. Farr and McJunkin were the first to step out. When a number deemed sufficient were out, Gen. Sumpter gave orders to advance, commence the attack and, if necessary, fall back. The action was commenced with great spirit, the assailing party gradually yielding to superior numbers until Tarleton made a general charge with a view of pushing his adversary from his advantageous position. He was repulsed in the first onset with a heavy loss. A second was tried with no better success, when he drew off his whole force and left the field of conflict. The numbers of the respective parties are variously estimated. Tarleton’s is thought to have been 400, and Sumpter’s perhaps about equal. It is thought 150 Georgians were present under Col. Twiggs. There was a great disparity in the loss of the two parties. The British loss in killed and wounded amounted to near 200; that of the Americans about one-sixth of that number.

Among the wounded was Gen. Sumpter, who received a bullet in the breast, by which he was disabled for service for several months. The command now devolved on Col. Twiggs.